Category: Peace and War

Libya: The Blitzkrieg breaks down: Negotiations Needed

Dozens of people were killed in an air raid on 3 July 2019 on a detention center holding migrants in a camp at Tajoura, a suburb of Tripoli according to the U.N. Support Mission in Libya.  Most of those killed and wounded were Africans from Sudan, Eritrea and Somalia who had hoped to reach Europe but were blocked in Libya.  Others held in the detention center had been returned to Libya, arrested trying to cross the Mediterranean Sea. In 2018, some 15,000 persons were intercepted on boats at sea and returned to Libya, placed in detention centers without charge and with no […]

Continue Reading

Macedonia-Greece Dispute Over the name of Macedonia

( Note on how to cite this journal: Author, Date of the post, WMO Conflict Insight, Title of the post,  ISSN: 2628-6998, https://worldmediation.org/conflict-insight ) The protracted conflict between Macedonia and Greece over the name of Macedonia involved many actors and players, direct and indirect, each seeking to take its share on the cake. The main actors in one of the long-lasting disputes in the world over history, identity and territory have been—up to recently—Macedonia and Greece. There have been other actors and bystanders—indirectly engaged in conflict—including Bulgaria, Serbia, Kosovo, as well as Russia. Nationalist groups in the Balkans have played their part, too. Fortunately, […]

Continue Reading

The Afghan conflict and peace prospects

( Note on how to cite this journal: Author, Date of the post, WMO Conflict Insight, Title of the post,  ISSN: 2628-6998, https://worldmediation.org/conflict-insight ) What is the conflict about? The United States government, following the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001 in New York that killed more than 3.000 people, identified the terrorist organisation al-Qaeda, and its leader, Osama bin Laden, as masterminds that organised the attacks.  Bin Laden, a Saudi Arabian national, had been openly confronting the U.S. and assuming the realisation of terrorist attacks on U.S. targets in Africa and the Middle East during the 1990s. To avoid being captured by […]

Continue Reading

US – Chi​na Trade War

The US and China conflict intensified in 2018 that entails placement of tariffs. The president of the United States sought to mend the abuse of a broken international system and unfair trade activities between the two nations. The US held that Chinese laws undermined the intellectual property rights to engage joint ventures with their companies. For that matter, the US, Canada, Mexico, and the EU nations allege the Chinese market to be distorted, thus do not recognize it as a market economy. In 2018, Richard Trumka president claimed that China had robbed the US intellectual property and forced its way […]

Continue Reading

Conflict and mediation in Venezuela

A humanitarian crisis of enormous proportions is underway in Venezuela that has already caused an exodus comparable to Syria at war. According to statistics, since 2015, more than 3 million people have left the country, targeting mainly the closest countries, such as Colombia, Panama, Costa Rica and Brazil. In this way, the crisis in Venezuela affects not only the country but Latin America as a whole. What is happening in Venezuela? What interests and what players are involved in the conflict? What similarities would there be between this conflict and other precedents? Can the sanctions imposed by the United States […]

Continue Reading

Politics of Compromise: The Tajikistan Peace Process

In comparison with many of the current intra-state conflicts, the inter-Tajik violence is notable both for its rapid escalation to war in 1992, less than a year after formal independence, and for its relatively quick conclusion through a negotiated settlement signed in June 1997. The peace process was a good example of multi-track diplomacy: the United Nations, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, the Organization of the Islamic Conference, neighbouring governments in particular Russia, Iran, Pakistan, Afghan factions, and other Central Asian republics born from the USSR, the Tajik government, the United Tajik Opposition (more opposition than united), […]

Continue Reading

Mindful questions on the conflict in Syria

Basic Facts The war began in 2011 when the public was protesting wrongful, and torture in the country, the president Bashar Al-Assad reacted by imprisonment of more people and killing hundreds of them. That led to the formation of a rebel group known as the Free Syrian Army to oust the authoritative regime in July 2011 (BBC News, 2019). The Middle East countries like Jordan, Israel, and Saudi Arabia are against such acts, thus support the opposition while Iran supports the president and has supplied soldiers to reinforce the government forces. Besides, it has emerged as a backyard for international […]

Continue Reading

Cameroon: Moving fast when there are short windows of opportunity

On 8 May 2019, Michelle Bachelet, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, after a 3-day mission to the Cameroon, welcomed the Cameroon government’s willingness to cooperate over finding workable solutions to what she called “major human rights and humanitarian crises” caused by months of serious unrest and violence across the southwest and north of the country.  She said “I believe that there is a clear – if possibly short – window of opportunity to arrest the crises that have led to hundreds of thousands of internally displaced people as well as the killings and brutal human rights violations […]

Continue Reading

Yemen and World Law: Building from Current Violations

“Shall we not learn from life its laws, dynamics, balances?  Learn to base our needs not on death, destruction, waste, but renewal?”— Nancy Newhall On 16 April 2019, U.S. President Donald Trump vetoed S.J. Resolution 7 to withdraw U.S. support for the Saudi and United Arab Emirates-led coalition in the war on Yemen.   The resolution had passed both houses of Congress with bipartisan support.  However, there are most likely not enough votes to override the veto; a two-thirds majority is needed. Also on 16 April, a French investigative NGO with web journal Disclose published a note of the French military intelligence service […]

Continue Reading

After 30 Years of Stagnation, Incompetence a​nd Repression, Omar al-Bashir of Sudan is Pushed Out. Problems Remain

On 11 April 2019, the Defense Minister of Sudan, Ahmed Awad Ibn Auf, announced that President Omar al-Bashir had been removed from office and was under house arrest along with a few members of his inner circle.  General Ibn Auf proposed that a transitional body of military and technicians lead the country for a two-year period after which elections for president would be held.  Some have called the events “a recycled coup”. Omar al-Bashir had come to power on 30 June 1989 in a military coup against the largely civilian coalition government led by Sadiq al-Mahdi, great-grandson of Muhammed Ahmad of Mahdist […]

Continue Reading

Will the U.N. Appeal for a halt to the March on Tripoli be heard?

With the administrative-political situation in Libya badly stalemated and a meeting for negotiations to be held 14-16 April unlikely to make progress, on Thursday 4 April 2019, General Khalifa Hafter, one of the key players in the drama decided to start a “March on Tripoli” and to take overall power by force. Most of the significant buildings in Libyan cities were built by Italians during the Fascist period when Libya was an Italian colony.  Thus, General Hafter has patterned himself on Mussolini’s 1922 “March on Rome”.  In 1922, the diplomats of most States looked away when Mussolini marched or the diplomats took it […]

Continue Reading

Algeria: The long goodbye

Street demonstrations began in Algers on 22 February 2019 and quickly spread to other cities in Algeria.  The demonstrations, often led by young people, are massive on Fridays, the chief day of rest.  The first demands were that President Abdelaziz Boutefika not stand for a fifth term as president having already been president for 20 years since 1999.  The demands were all the more reasonable that Boutefika had had a stroke in 2013 and was unable to walk and largely could not speak.  He had been seriously ill in 2005 and was in week condition from 2005 to 2013 when his health deteriorated seriously.  He […]

Continue Reading

Women in Armed Conflicts: Role and Consequences

The Ongoing Conflicts in the North West and South West Regions of Cameroon. Abstract The role of women in armed conflicts is more prominent than imagined. Besides being victims due to their vulnerability, women have played frontline roles in revolutions, independence struggles and wars in many countries. The focus on this write up is the role women have played so far on the ongoing crises in the English-speaking regions of Cameroon, and the effects of the crises on them. What started in October 2016 as a teachers and lawyers strike demanding better working conditions in these two English speaking regions […]

Continue Reading

Navroz: Turkish Troops in Afrim: Renewal and Complexity

Navroz, usually celebrated on 21 March in Iran and Central Asia, is the “New Day”, the end of the old year with its hardships and deceptions and the start of the New Year to be filled with hope and optimism. With each periodical festival, the participants find the same sacred time – the same that had been manifested in the festival of the previous year or the festival of a century earlier. It is a day for spiritual renewal and physical rejuvenation and is usually a time for reciting devotional poetry, presenting food with symbolic meaning to guests, and visits […]

Continue Reading

Women as Peacemakers

Seeing with eyes that are gender aware, women tend to make connections between the oppression that is the ostensible cause of conflict (ethnic or national oppression) in the light of another cross-cutting one: that of gender regime.  Feminist work tends to represent war as a continuum of violence from the bedroom to the battlefield, traversing our bodies and our sense of self.  We glimpse this more readily because as women we have seen that ‘the home’ itself is not the haven it is cracked up to be.  Why, if it is a refuge, do so many women have to escape […]

Continue Reading

Women in Peace & Security: Women of faith in peacebuilding

Abstract Women have a dual experience in their roles as advocates for peace, particularly women of faith. The irony is that while they are more immersed in the community and thus have the power to exert more influence, they are invisible and excluded from most peace processes. The realm of religion, like most other fields, have been traditionally lead by men. In this article, we examine the role of women in religious peacebuilding, as well as the role of women faith leaders in peacebuilding. We will take a closer examination of the role that women play in alternative dispute resolution […]

Continue Reading

The Warsaw Process: Slow Start, Clear Focus

“This is a new era for the future and for prosperity for all the nations” Yusuf bin Alawi, Foreign Minister of Oman, said optimistically in Warsaw at the 13-14 February 2019 Ministerial Conference to Promote a Future of Peace and Security in the Middle East. The sunrise of the new era may be showing its first rays on the horizon but is certainly not yet visible to all. At the same time that bin Alawi was speaking, the Presidents of Russia, Turkey and Iran were meeting in Sochi on the Black Sea to discuss the future of Syria. They were […]

Continue Reading

Warsaw Process Towards a Conference on Security and Cooperation in the Middle East

On 13-14 February 2019, there is planned The Ministerial Conference to Promote a Future of Peace and Security in the Middle East. The conference was called jointly by the governments of the U.S.A. and Poland, but it is likely that the U.S.A. is the “senior partner”. The goal of the conference as set out in the invitation is “to take the policy priorities that emerge from the ministerial meeting and to operationalize those policies by having follow-on meetings in various parts of the world.” When the conference was first presented, there was a strong anti-Iran coloring in the U.S. presentation, […]

Continue Reading

Moscow Format for Afghan Conflict Resolution Continues

Building within the framework of the multi-State efforts for conflict resolution in Afghanistan, more narrowly-focused talks took place in Moscow on 5 and 6 February 2019 among some 50 Afghan participants led on the one hand by former President Hamed Karzai, President from late 2001 to 2014, and Sher Mohammed Abbas Stanikzai, the chief negotiator for the Taliban.  While the original Moscow Format conference was organized by the Foreign Ministry of the Russian Federation, this follow up was stated as being at the invitation of the Afghan diaspora living in Russia.  In any difficult, prolonged effort as this Moscow Format, […]

Continue Reading

Mahatma Gandhi! Efforts of Mediation in the Middle East

At a time when armed conflicts and strong regional tensions exist in the wider Middle East and when the mediation roe of the United Nations in the armed conflicts of Yemen, Syria and Libya seem at a dead point, on 2 October, the U.N.-designated Day of Nonviolence and the birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi, it is useful to look at the efforts of Gandhi to mediate in the Jewish-Palestinian tensions which had turned violent in 1936 Mahatma Gandhi was a man of dialogue and compromise. A British-trained lawyer, he always knew the limits of the law and knew when not […]

Continue Reading

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. Additional Information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close